Magnetic Filters

Please download the PDF document for O-ring size details for our magnetic filters Click here

Optimum Wi-Fi Products

After December 2023 the C-Home Wi-Fi app will not be supported and customers are encouraged to switch to the new Smart Life app, which has a better user interface, improved performance, regular updates, better compatibility and continued support. Although the C-Home App will still work, customers should switch to the Smart Life app as soon as possible to avoid potential disruptions. The app is available on the Apple App Store and Google Play Store. Customers with questions or concerns can contact customer support. Please visit one of our Wifi product pages and scan the QR Code under the product description by CLICKING HERE

Please view the videos on the OP-WFSTAT product page Click Here

You can set up a boost time by opening the app and selecting the “Smart” option in the middle at the bottom of the display.

Select the “+” symbol at the top of the screen to add a new smart program.
Select “tap to run”.
Select “run the device”
Select the device you want to control
Select “switch“, then select “ON” and then save
Select “Next” at the top right of the screen
Now select “+” in the TASK pane
Select “DELAY”
Set the time you want for the “ON” period and select “Next”
Now select “+” in the TASK pane
Select “run the device”
Select the device you selected previously
Select “Switch”
Select “Reverse Switch” then save
Hit “next” at top of the screen

You can rename this to boost or whatever you want by touching the “name” just above the large save button at the bottom of the screen. Name it to whatever you want and save.
Scroll to the very bottom of the page and make sure the “Show on home page” is selected.
Hit the large save button at the bottom of the screen and you have completed setting the boost function.

Once you have this boost feature programmed, you can activate it by opening the app and touching the panel with the name you gave it at the top of the screen.

To replace and old Duostat, Touch or RF205 receiver with the Optimum OP-TPISTAT or OP-WFSTAT receiver, please see the terminal connection conversion in the image Click Here 

The firmware has been updated on this product and the sun symbol does not appear in manual operation. This was causing some confusion for some users and was removed. When you press the “SET” button to switch from the Programme mode to Manual you will see the “PRG” symbols disappear. Pressing the “SET” button repeatedly will step through the options:- Programme, Manual & Holiday modes.

Yes, This Wi-Fi thermostat was designed to use the C-HOME App.

Note:
After December 2023 the C-Home Wi-Fi app will not be supported and customers are encouraged to switch to the new Smart Life app, which has a better user interface, improved performance, regular updates, better compatibility and continued support. Although the C-Home App will still work, customers should switch to the Smart Life app as soon as possible to avoid potential disruptions. The app is available on the Apple App Store and Google Play Store. Customers with questions or concerns can contact customer support. Please use this QRcode to navigate to your App Store to download the Smart Life App.

After December 2023 the C-Home Wi-Fi app will not be supported and maybe withdrawn from the App Store before that time. Customers are encouraged to switch to the new Smart Life app, which has a better user interface, improved performance, regular updates, better compatibility and continued support. Although the C-Home App will still work, customers should switch to the Smart Life app as soon as possible to avoid potential disruptions. The app is available on the Apple App Store and Google Play Store. Customers with questions or concerns can contact customer support. Please use this QR code to navigate to your App Store to download the Smart Life App.

If your phone or router is connected through a VPN, please disconnect and use your router’s ip address during the setup. The product will not complete the set-up if the phone or router is connected using a VPN service. This can be enabled once the pairing has been completed and will function correctly.

Some routers come with both 5GHz & 2.4GHz, with a single SSID set with a shared name. WiFi devices can connect with the 5GHz network if close to the router, or the 2.4GHz network if further away – 5GHz is faster but has a reduced range compared to 2.4GHz. Most routers will have a configuration set to use 5GHz as the preferred connection. If you try to connect to an Optimum WiFi device and can’t (the connect function goes full circle and then fails), your mobile may be connected to the 5GHz network.

You will need to go to the Admin page of the router. You may need to refer to the router documentation or contact your service provider for help with this. Separate the channels and rename the 2.4GHz/5GHz networks with different names i.e. add 2g or 5g to the end of each SSID respectively. Re-connect your phone to WiFi, selecting the re-named 2.4GHz network. You should now be able to set up the WiFi controls in the usual fashion.

Once the WiFi controls are set up in this way, control of WiFi devices is possible whether the mobile is connected to 5GHz or 2.4GHz. That’s because the input from your mobile is actually sending data to the server, which is then relaying the control commands or programming changes back to the WiFi device via your router, and because the WiFi router is dual-band, it can address those devices connected to either the 5GHz or 2.4GHz networks.

If this fails, please check your Firewall settings have no security features enabled to prevent new devices from connecting. You may need to refer to the router documentation or contact your service provider for help with this.

Check the Communication protocol: This should be set as “WPA2-PSK (AES)”. This is a setting you would need to check/edit on the Admin page of the router. You may need to refer to the router documentation or contact your service provider for help with this.

Example BThub Dual Band set-up click here 
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If installed behind a firewall, please check the following domains and ports are open/whitelisted:

Ports the device will use:
1883 8886 8883 80 443 6666 6667 6668 6669

Domains the device will use:
*.iot-dns.com、*.tuyaus.com、*.tuyaeu.com、*.wgine.com、*.tuya.com、*.airtakeapp.com、*.getairtake.com

Make sure you’re connecting to a 2.4GHz signal and not 5GHz. Double-check that your password etc. is entered correctly.

If you have your modem firewall set to “high” you may need to edit it and change it to “low”. You may need to refer to the router documentation or contact your service provider for help with this if you are unsure of how to check/make these changes.


Upon successfully adding the device, you should have the capability to return to your smartphone’s Wi-Fi settings and reestablish a connection with your router’s Wi-Fi network.

After reconnecting, you should gain access to the Optimum switch either through Wi-Fi or remotely via your phone’s internet connection.

Please ensure that you have re-established your regular Wi-Fi connection between your phone and your router.

If your Optimum Connect timer is showing as offline in the App and the button on the product is unresponsive, it may indicate a conflict with the Smart Life App. To resolve this, follow these steps:

1. Disconnect or isolate the Optimum Connect timer from power.

2. Delete the timer from the Smart Life App. When doing so, make sure to select the option to delete all data associated with the device.

3. Power up the Optimum Connect timer, and press and hold the button on the device for a few seconds to put it back into pairing mode.

4. Open the Smart Life App and select “Add Device.” For all timers, except Wi-Fi thermostats, please choose “Socket Wi-Fi” as the device to add.

These steps should help you re-establish a connection between your Optimum Connect timer and the Smart Life App, resolving any unresponsiveness or offline issues you may have encountered.

Thermostats

Please view the videos on the OP-WFSTAT product page Click Here

Please refer to the Comms pairing sequence in the attached pdf click here

To replace and old Duostat, Touch or RF205 receiver with the Optimum OP-TPISTAT or OP-WFSTAT receiver, please see the terminal connection conversion in the image Click Here

The firmware has been updated on this product and the sun symbol does not appear in manual operation. This was causing some confusion for some users and was removed. When you press the “SET” button to switch from the Programme mode to Manual you will see the “PRG” symbols disappear. Pressing the “SET” button repeatedly will step through the options:- Programme, Manual & Holiday modes.

Before running though the procedure of pairing, it is important to turn the power off to the boiler/receiver for at least 15 to 30 seconds. This puts the receiver into a mode whereby it transmits the code to pair-up to the thermostat (Transmitter). The main reason for the pairing to fail, is that the “POWER OFF” before going through the process has been missed.

The pairing sequence is…

1, Turn boiler / receiver off for 15 to 30 seconds.

2, Turn the power back on.

3, Touch bottom right corner of display on thermostat until display changes and you see “SET” appear bottom right and “01” appear bottom left and Release finger.

4, Touch the word “SET” (and release finger) and you will see “02” bottom left.

5,Touch the word “SET” (and release finger) you will see some numbers appear bottom left and big “00” in display.

6, Touch the numbers on bottom left of display (and release finger) and wait until you see “00” change to “AA”

7, Don’t touch anything and wait until display returns to normal, showing temperature etc.

The transmitter and receiver should now paired together.

You can manually reset the calibration by entering the configuration menu and adjusting the temperature offset value. To do this please follow the steps below.

1, Tap the bottom right hand corner of the display momentarily.

2, Touch and hold finger on bottom right hand corner of display until you see the word “set” appear (about 5 seconds after touching screen).

3, When you see “01” at the bottom left and a large number in the main display area, set the calibration value touching the left or right of the display. The default value should be -1 degree, but you may need to adjust up or down if not correct.

4, After setting offset value, press the bottom right “set” to move to configuration step “02”

5, Set this value to 0.5 by touching the left side of the display.

6, Wait approx. 10 seconds and the display will revert to normal and the displayed temperature should now be correct.

7, Reset your target temperature to your normal level.

The battery orientation is marked under the front cover. For clarity, please click here

No. The OP-TPISTAT is RF only and does not have Wi-Fi capability.

A thermostat or timer with ‘volt-free contacts’, or ‘volt-free switching’, operates a switch that opens and closes its contacts, but no voltage or current will flow. When a product has volt-free contacts, the installing electrician must ensure that the correct voltage (to be switched) is connected to the ‘common’ contact of the switch. This voltage, once connected to common, will then be fed to the circuit to be controlled, via the normally open contact. Wiring connected to the common contact must be suitably rated for the load current. The advantage of such an arrangement is that e.g. a mains-powered timer can switch a non-mains circuit, such as a low voltage alarm or lighting circuit.

You can set-up your Towerstat to operate manually. Please click on the link for a guide click here

The RF signal will pass through brick, glass and other standard building materials. Each obstacle will reduce the strength of the signal and in some instances could reduce it enough to block communications altogether. Please click on the link for a guide that shows typical losses. click here

For systems with an existing time control, set the heating to constant (fixed on). If there appears to be no communication between transmitter and receiver refer to the instruction on commissioning procedures.

If your thermostat is battery powered check that they have sufficient charge to operate your thermostat. If your thermostat is mains powered, check that the power is still present.

You have to select which day or days you want to programme. Select the day or days then enter the programme number you want.

Check that the setback (economy) temperature is set low enough. Overnight the temperature drops and if the ambient room temperature drops below the setback (economy) set-point, the heating will come on.

It is possible to use your existing programmer/timer to control the on/off periods. Set your Towerstat RF to “P1” and follow the wiring instruction at the following link click here

There are Radio Frequency (RF) thermostats available that can work over considerable distances and control the system without the need of wiring.

A thermostat that only requires two wires is usually connected to switch the live conductor. Live supply would connect to the common and switched live to N/O (normally open for heating systems) or N/C (normally closed for cooling systems). The neutral can be made safe and not used.

Most bi-metal thermostats require a neutral to complete the circuit that powers an accelerator heater and possibly an indicator lamp. Bi-metal thermostats require the accelerator heater to give a small differential and give consistent switching.

TPI (Time Proportional & Integral) control is a sophisticated algorithm used in heating systems for precise temperature regulation. It employs a control technique where the duration and frequency of the heating cycles are modulated to maintain the target temperature as closely as possible without large fluctuations.

Here’s how it works technically: TPI divides each cycle into smaller intervals. It calculates the difference between the actual and desired temperatures and adjusts the heating accordingly. If the temperature is too low, it increases the “on” time; if too high, it decreases it.

The ‘Integral’ aspect means it also considers the cumulative error over time, not just the immediate difference. This helps to eliminate the residual error, preventing the temperature from settling above or below the setpoint after initial adjustments.

For example, in a heating system, if the target temperature is 20°C, TPI may start with longer “on” periods to heat up quickly. As the temperature approaches 20°C, it shortens the “on” periods and may even fine-tune the “off” periods to avoid overshooting the target. Over time, it uses the integral calculation to fine-tune further, ensuring the room stays at a stable 20°C with minimal fluctuations.

TPI control is more precise than traditional two-point (on/off) control because it adjusts the heating cycle’s duration based on the temperature’s deviation from the setpoint. It minimizes overshoot and undershoot by accounting for the thermal characteristics of the space being heated. This results in a more consistent temperature and can be more energy-efficient since it reduces the frequency of large temperature swings that require more energy to correct. In essence, TPI provides a smoother approach to reaching and maintaining the desired temperature.

Two-point control, also known as on-off control, has several disadvantages:

Temperature Variability: It can lead to significant temperature fluctuations above and below the setpoint, as the system only turns on or off at certain thresholds.

Inefficiency: These fluctuations can lead to inefficiency in energy use because the system might overheat or cool, then need to correct itself.

Wear and Tear: The frequent cycling on and off can cause increased wear and tear on mechanical components, reducing their lifespan.

Lack of Fine Tuning: It lacks the ability to finely tune the output to the exact needs of the space, which can result in discomfort and wasted energy.

Timers & Programmers

The TS1 timeswitch is a device that enables users to program up to 3 periods per day for automatic on and off functionality. To set up the timeswitch to turn on in the morning and turn off in the evening, the user needs to program the three periods with the desired on and off times. For example, P1 can be programmed to turn on at 6:30 am and turn off at 9:00 am, P2 can be programmed to turn on at 12:00 pm and turn off at 1:00 pm, and P3 can be programmed to turn on at 5:00 pm and turn off at 10:30 pm.

Once the desired on and off times have been programmed, the user can return the device to normal running mode and select the “Once” option by pressing the “Mode” button. With each press, the “Mode” button will cycle through available options until “ONCE” appears. Selecting the “ONCE” option will instruct the timer to only take note of the first “On” instruction and the last “Off” instruction, ignoring all other instructions. This allows the user to ensure that the device will turn on at the desired time in the morning and turn off at the desired time in the evening, regardless of any other programmed periods.

Please download the example programming guide for the DFST by clicking here

A thermostat or timer with ‘volt-free contacts’, or ‘volt-free switching’, operates a switch that opens and closes its contacts, but no voltage or current will flow. When a product has volt-free contacts, the installing electrician must ensure that the correct voltage (to be switched) is connected to the ‘common’ contact of the switch. This voltage, once connected to common, will then be fed to the circuit to be controlled, via the normally open contact. Wiring connected to the common contact must be suitably rated for the load current. The advantage of such an arrangement is that e.g. a mains-powered timer can switch a non-mains circuit, such as a low voltage alarm or lighting circuit.

The main reason a digital programmer will appear to reset or suffer program corruption is a surge/spike in the mains supply or from the load itself. If you suffer power cuts or see your lights dim or brighten, your power supply is fluctuating. If your programmer is connected to a control circuit via a contactor or relay you could be suffering from “Back EMF”. To overcome both of these situations please refer to our suggested suppression techniques click here

Check that the override has not been set to “Fixed off” or the thermostat set too low.

Check that the override has not been set to “Fixed on”.

All of the digital timers that have a built in battery backup can be programmed and settings changed etc. whilst running on the battery. The full display and switching of outputs can only be achieved once the power supply has been connected.

You will need to set your timer to the current time by aligning the outer dial with the arrow marker on the face of the timer. You then move the tappets outward between the times you want the timer to be on. Please see the PDF for a more detailed explanation click here

LED lighting has a transformer that uses power factor correction on the start-up circuit. This can cause an inrush current that is hundreds of times higher than the running current and overloads the contacts. Although this may only exist for 5 or 10 milliseconds, it is enough time to tack weld the output contacts. If you have this problem you will need to switch the lighting circuit with a contactor.
For more information please read the article on this website click here

The Perry 1IO7080 is often used for break time sounders and the output can be set down to a 1-second output if required. This type of output is generally referred to as “Pulse Output” and is a standard feature on the Perry Din Rail timer.

Understanding NiMH Battery Degradation: Causes and Prevention

In today’s tech-driven world, batteries are the unsung heroes that power our devices. Among the various types of batteries available, Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH) batteries have carved a niche for themselves due to their rechargeable nature and high capacity. However, like all good things, NiMH batteries are not immune to the ravages of time. When left in a discharged state for extended periods, these batteries can experience degradation, leading to reduced performance and lifespan.

So, what causes NiMH batteries to degrade over time, and how can we prevent it? In this article, we’ll delve into the intricacies of NiMH battery deterioration, exploring the chemical processes at play and offering tips on how to keep your batteries performing at their best.

Self-Discharge: The Silent Culprit

One of the primary reasons behind NiMH battery degradation is a phenomenon known as self-discharge. Even when not in use, NiMH batteries gradually lose their charge over time. This loss can be attributed to the internal chemical reactions taking place within the battery, albeit at a slow rate. On average, NiMH batteries experience a self-discharge rate of about 0.2% to 0.3% per day. While this may seem inconsequential in the short term, it can add up significantly if the battery remains unused for an extended period.

The “Sleep” State Conundrum

NiMH batteries take a different approach when they’re not used for several months. They enter a state often referred to as “sleep.” During this slumber, their ability to hold a charge undergoes a significant reduction. This means that when you eventually try to wake them from their hibernation for that important device or gadget, they might not have the power you’d expect.

Peeling Back the Layers: Understanding the Chemistry

Now, let’s get a bit technical. The degradation of NiMH batteries when left discharged involves complex chemical processes within the battery. These processes can include the crystallization of electrolytes and the degradation of electrodes, among other things. Over time, these changes within the battery can manifest as a reduced capacity to accept a charge and deliver power.

While the precise chemical reactions at play are intricate, the practical implications are clear: a decreased ability to hold and deliver power effectively. This ultimately leads to a shorter lifespan and diminished performance for your NiMH batteries.

Preventing NiMH Battery Degradation: Best Practices

The good news is that while NiMH battery degradation is an inevitability, there are steps you can take to slow down the process and prolong the life of your batteries:

1. Regular Recharging: Make it a habit to recharge your NiMH batteries, even if they haven’t been used for a while. This prevents deep discharge, which can accelerate degradation.

2. Storage Conditions: Store your batteries in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight. Extreme temperatures and humidity can exacerbate self-discharge and the “sleep” state.

3. Battery Management Systems (BMS): Consider using NiMH batteries with built-in Battery Management Systems, which can help maintain the batteries in good condition by preventing overcharging or deep discharging.

4. Rotate Batteries: If you have multiple sets of NiMH batteries, rotate them regularly to ensure all batteries get used and recharged periodically.

5. Check the Manufacturer’s Guidelines: Always follow the manufacturer’s recommendations regarding storage, charging, and usage of NiMH batteries.

In conclusion, NiMH batteries are reliable and versatile energy sources, but they require proper care to maintain their performance over time. Understanding the causes of their degradation and taking appropriate preventive measures can significantly extend their lifespan. As we continue to rely on batteries for our daily lives, a little care and attention can go a long way in ensuring these energy workhorses keep powering our devices efficiently.

Valves and TRVs

To completely shut off your TRV, avoid using the thermostatic head for this purpose. Instead, follow these steps:

  1. Remove the TRV head.

  2. Locate the “Decorators Cap” that comes with the TRV.

  3. Screw the “Decorators Cap” fully onto the TRV body. This action will lock the pin down and effectively close the valve.

By using the “Decorators Cap” in this manner, you can ensure that your TRV is completely shut off.

The central heating synchronous valve motor is an important component in heating systems, used in both mid-position 3-Port valves and 2-port zone valves, to control the flow of hot water or heating fluid. Let’s explore its function in each valve type.

3-Port Mid Position Valves:

In a mid-position valve, the synchronous valve motor serves a crucial function in three different states:

Closed Heating Circuit (Default State): When there is no demand for heating or hot water, the synchronous valve motor keeps the valve in a closed position, ensuring that the heating circuit remains closed to conserve energy.

Mid-Position State: When there is a simultaneous demand for both heating and hot water, the synchronous valve motor moves the valve to the mid-position. This allows the flow of hot water or heating fluid to both the heating system and the hot water system simultaneously, enabling both functions to operate together effectively.

Heating Only State: When there is a demand for heating but not hot water, the synchronous valve motor moves the valve to a specific position that directs the flow of hot water or heating fluid to the heating system only. This ensures dedicated heating control without diverting hot water to unnecessary areas.

2-Port Zone Valves:

In a 2-port zone valve, the synchronous valve motor is utilized primarily to open the valve. The valve itself is equipped with a spring return mechanism that automatically closes the valve when the motor is not actively powered.

When a signal is received from the thermostat or central heating control system, the synchronous valve motor is activated to open the valve, allowing the flow of hot water or heating fluid to a specific zone or area of the heating system. This enables individual control and zoning of different heating zones.

Once the motor receives the signal and opens the valve, it remains powered to keep the valve in the open position. However, when the signal is no longer present, the synchronous valve motor is deactivated, and the spring return mechanism takes over. The spring returns the valve to its default closed position, shutting off the flow of hot water or heating fluid to the designated zone.

By utilizing the motor to open the valve and relying on the spring return to close it, the 2-port zone valve allows for efficient and reliable control of the heating system. The motor ensures precise opening of the valve to direct the flow, while the spring return mechanism provides a fail-safe mechanism for automatic closure when the motor is not actively powered.

To summarize, in a 2-port zone valve, the synchronous valve motor is responsible for opening the valve, allowing the flow of hot water or heating fluid to a specific zone. The valve incorporates a spring return mechanism to automatically close the valve when the motor is not actively powered, ensuring reliable operation and control of the heating system.

In both mid-position valves and 2-port zone valves, one of the conveniences is the ability to replace the valve motor without the need to drain the entire heating system. This feature offers several advantages:

Time and Effort Saving: When a valve motor needs replacement, not having to drain the entire system saves significant time and effort. Draining a heating system can be a time-consuming and complex task, requiring careful steps to avoid damage or airlocks. By eliminating the need for system draining, the process of replacing the valve motor becomes much simpler and quicker.

Cost-Effective Solution: Draining a heating system may require professional assistance, which can add to the overall cost. By removing the necessity of system drainage, the expense of hiring professionals or investing in specialized equipment for draining can be avoided, resulting in cost savings.

Minimized Disruption: Draining a heating system disrupts the functioning of the system, requiring it to be shut down temporarily. This can lead to discomfort and inconvenience, particularly during colder seasons when heating is essential. With the ability to replace the valve motor without draining the system, the disruption to the heating system’s operation is minimized, ensuring continued comfort for occupants.

Simplified Maintenance: The option to replace the valve motor without draining the system simplifies routine maintenance tasks. Whether in mid-position valves or 2-port zone valves, if motor replacement is required as part of regular servicing or troubleshooting, it can be easily done without interrupting the entire heating system’s functionality, making maintenance procedures more efficient.

Overall, the convenience of being able to replace the valve motor in both mid-position valves and 2-port zone valves without draining the heating system saves time, effort, and cost. It minimizes disruption to the system’s operation, allows for more efficient maintenance, and ensures uninterrupted heating comfort for occupants.

RPM explained:

When it comes to control and added torque, a lower rotational speed of 4 RPM (Rotations Per Minute) can often be preferred over higher speeds like 5 or 6 RPM. The slower speed allows for finer and more precise control over the movement of the mechanism or device. It provides a smoother operation and reduces the risk of overshooting or inaccurate positioning. Additionally, a lower RPM can offer increased torque, which is beneficial in applications that require higher rotational force or when dealing with heavier loads. The added torque ensures the motor has the necessary power to handle the required tasks effectively and reliably. Therefore, opting for 4 RPM can provide improved control and enhanced torque, resulting in better performance and accuracy in various applications.

There are reducing bushes and a 10mm olive supplied with the TRV. Please open the PDF file to see how they are assembled. click here For one-piece reducer click here

The grey wire must be connected to the cylinder satisfied and then to the programmers “hot water off” terminal. This provides 230V AC to the grey wire when the hot water is satisfied or not in demand. Without the grey wire connected in this way, when calling for heating only the valve will open until it reaches the mid position. Power on the grey will allow it to travel fully and energize the boiler and pump.

Check the flow direction. There is an arrow on the body of the valve to show the correct orientation.

No, the valve will remain in that state until power is removed or hot water is called for. The synchronous motor is rated for running in a continuously stalled state.

The valve will feel hot to the touch, as the energy of the stalled motor is dissipated through the valve body. This is normal and the valve is designed to operate in this way.

To avoid this happening…. Set the Hot water to go into demand after the heating has switched off.

This is to ensure that should a leak occur that water does not come into contact with the internal electrical components.

Yes, the “VAL322MP & VAL222MV” Tower valve actuators can be replaced independently of the valve. This is the same process for both valves click here

Once you have added your zone valve you will need to wire it in parallel to your existing heating control valve. If you have an S-Plan system (2 x 2 Ports) click here

Once you have added your zone valve you will need to wire it in parallel to your existing heating control valve. If you have a Y-Plan system (Mid position) click here

Yes, you will need to add a changeover relay to make the VAL228MV work in the same way. Please download the schematic showing how to connect a relay click here

Yes, join the white and grey wires together and supply them with 230V AC to spool the valve open. The default port that is closed is port “A”. When power is supplied to white and grey the valve will motor until port “B” has closed. Remove power and the valve will return to Port “A” being closed and port “B” open.

Please find a step by step guide for fitting pipes into a push fit elbow. The installer must ensure they deburr the end of the pipe to avoid damaging the O-ring, as a small scratch/cut could result in a leak as the pressure increases.

 

  1. Measure and Mark: Begin by measuring the length of the pipe that needs to be inserted into the push-fit elbow. Use a marker or pencil to mark the insertion depth on the pipe. This will ensure that the pipe is fully inserted into the elbow.

 

  1. Cut the Pipe: Use a suitable pipe cutter or saw to cut the pipe to the desired length, taking into account the insertion depth marked in the previous step. Ensure that the cut is clean and square to facilitate a proper seal.

 

  1. Deburr the Cut End: After cutting the pipe, use a deburring tool or sandpaper to remove any burrs or rough edges from the cut end. This will help prevent damage to the O-ring and ensure a smooth insertion into the push-fit elbow.

 

  1. Lubricate the O-ring: Apply a small amount of silicone-based lubricant or water-based soap to the O-ring inside the push-fit elbow. This will facilitate easier insertion of the pipe and help create a watertight seal.

 

  1. Insert the Pipe: Hold the push-fit elbow firmly and insert the prepared end of the pipe into the elbow fitting. Ensure that the pipe is inserted straight and aligned with the fitting.

 

  1. Push Until Bottomed Out: Push the pipe into the push-fit elbow with a steady and even force. Do not stop when the pipe meets the O-ring; instead, continue pushing until the pipe passes through the O-ring and bottoms out against the fitting.

 

  1. Check Alignment: Once the pipe is fully inserted into the push-fit elbow, visually inspect the joint to ensure that the pipe is seated properly and aligned with the fitting. The insertion depth mark should be flush with the end of the fitting.

 

  1. Test the Connection: After inserting the pipe, test the connection by running water through the system or performing a pressure test, depending on the application. Check for any leaks or signs of water seepage around the joint.

 

  1. Secure and Support: Once the connection is confirmed to be watertight, secure the pipe in place using suitable support brackets or clips, especially if it is a horizontal run. This will help prevent stress on the joint and ensure long-term reliability.

 

By following these instructions carefully, you can prepare the end of a pipe and fit it into a push-fit elbow securely and reliably, ensuring a watertight seal and long-lasting performance.

Other

 

BS EN 215: BS EN 215 specifies the requirements for thermostatic radiator valves (TRVs) used in hot water central heating systems. It sets out the design, performance, and testing requirements for TRVs, including accuracy and reliability of temperature control, flow rates, and shut-off functions. Compliance with BS EN 215 ensures that TRVs are safe, reliable, and efficient, and can help to reduce energy consumption and costs.

CE Marking: The CE mark is a certification mark that indicates conformity with health, safety, and environmental protection standards for products sold within the European Economic Area (EEA). CE marking is applicable to a wide range of products, including toys, machinery, and medical devices. Manufacturers need to ensure that their products meet relevant EU directives and standards before affixing the CE mark.

EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive): The EMC Directive sets the standards for the electromagnetic compatibility of electrical and electronic equipment, including central heating controls. It ensures that such products do not interfere with other electrical equipment and do not suffer from interference themselves.

ErP (Energy-related Products Directive): The ErP sets the requirements for the energy efficiency of energy-related products, including central heating controls. It aims to promote the use of energy-efficient products and reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

LVD (Low Voltage Directive): The LVD is an EU directive that covers the safety requirements for electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage limits. The directive applies to equipment with a voltage between 50 and 1,000 volts for alternating current and between 75 and 1,500 volts for direct current. LVD ensures that electrical products within its scope are safe to use and pose no risk to users.

RED (Radio Equipment Directive): The RED is an EU directive that sets the standards for the safety and electromagnetic compatibility of radio equipment. Manufacturers must ensure that their products meet the requirements of the RED before placing them on the market within the EU.

RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances): RoHS is an EU directive that restricts the use of specific hazardous materials in the manufacturing of electrical and electronic equipment. It aims to protect human health and the environment by reducing the use of harmful substances, such as lead, mercury, and cadmium.

UKCA (UK Conformity Assessed): The UKCA mark is a certification mark used for goods placed on the market in Great Britain, replacing the CE mark after Brexit. It indicates that a product meets the relevant UK regulatory requirements. Manufacturers need to ensure their products comply with UK regulations before affixing the UKCA mark.

WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment): The WEEE Directive is an EU directive that aims to reduce the environmental impact of electrical and electronic waste. It sets collection, recycling, and recovery targets for electrical goods and requires producers to take responsibility for financing the treatment and disposal of their products.

WRAS (Water Regulations Advisory Scheme): WRAS is a UK-based certification that demonstrates compliance with water supply regulations and bylaws. Products with WRAS approval have been tested and proven not to cause waste, misuse, or contamination of the water supply. WRAS is particularly relevant for plumbing fittings, valves, and other water supply components.

Tower produces a range of specialized chemicals designed to optimize the performance of heating systems. These chemicals serve various functions, such as preventing corrosion & Leaks, improving efficiency, and addressing specific issues within heating systems.

It is essential for heating engineers and installers to be aware that boiler manufacturers regularly update the terms and conditions of their warranties. These updates may include guidelines on the use of third-party products, including chemicals and additives within heating systems.

To ensure compliance with warranty terms and to make informed decisions about the use of third-party products, we strongly recommend that engineers and installers:

1, Review Warranty Terms: Thoroughly examine the terms and conditions of the boiler manufacturer’s warranty. This is crucial to understand any restrictions or requirements related to the use of third-party chemicals or additives in heating systems.

2, Contact Boiler Manufacturer: For specific information regarding the use of third-party products and their impact on warranty coverage, contact the boiler manufacturer directly. They are the authoritative source for the most up-to-date warranty information and can provide guidance on using third-party products without voiding the warranty.

3, Compliance and Documentation: When using any chemicals or additives within heating systems, ensure compliance with both the manufacturer’s recommendations and industry best practices. Keep detailed records and documentation of any maintenance or modifications performed, including the use of third-party products.

Boiler manufacturers’ warranty terms may evolve over time, and their policies can vary between different models and product lines. Therefore, it is essential to engage directly with the manufacturer to obtain the most accurate and current information regarding warranty coverage when third-party products are involved.

Our commitment at Tower is to provide high-quality chemical solutions that enhance the performance and longevity of heating systems. However, we emphasize the importance of adhering to warranty terms set forth by boiler manufacturers to protect the interests of both engineers and end users.

In a domestic heating system, the terms “direct heating” and “indirect heating” refer to two distinct methods of heating the water that circulates through the system. These methods differ primarily in how they transfer heat to the water and the applications for which they are suitable:

1. Direct Heating:
– In a direct heating system, the water that circulates through the heating system comes into direct contact with the heat source. This means the water is heated directly by the heat-producing element.
– Typically, direct heating systems are used for heating water for immediate use, such as in tankless water heaters or some electric showers.
– A common example is an electric immersion heater, where an electric element heats the water as it flows past the element. This water is then typically used immediately, as in a shower or sink.
– Direct heating is more energy-efficient for on-demand heating but may not be suitable for central heating systems or applications that require large volumes of hot water to be stored for later use.

2. Indirect Heating:
– In an indirect heating system, the water that circulates through the heating system does not come into direct contact with the heat source. Instead, heat is transferred to the water indirectly through a heat exchanger or coil.
– This method is commonly used in central heating systems, including those using boilers or solar thermal collectors.
– A boiler, for example, heats a separate fluid (usually water or a water-glycol mixture) in a closed loop. This hot fluid passes through a heat exchanger, where it transfers its heat to the water in the central heating system. The water in the central heating system never mixes with the fluid in the boiler’s closed loop.
– Indirect heating is more suitable for applications where large volumes of hot water need to be stored and distributed throughout a building, such as for radiators, underfloor heating, or hot water storage tanks.
– It provides better control over the water temperature and is often more efficient when heating large quantities of water.

In summary, direct heating involves the water coming into direct contact with the heat source and is suitable for on-demand or small-scale water heating. Indirect heating uses a heat exchanger or intermediary fluid to transfer heat to the water, making it ideal for central heating systems and applications requiring a stored and distributed supply of hot water. The choice between these methods depends on the specific requirements and size of the heating system.

Safeguarding Your Digital Timers and Wi-Fi Devices Against Power Cuts.

In our increasingly digital world, many of our essential devices rely on digital timers for their efficient operation. However, even these advanced timers are not immune to the effects of power cuts. Repeated power interruptions can potentially render your digital timers and Wi-Fi devices inoperable, and the accompanying power surges pose significant risks.

Understanding the Vulnerability:

1. Loss of Programmed Settings: Most digital timers and Wi-Fi devices allow users to set specific schedules and configurations. These programmed settings are typically stored in non-volatile memory, designed to withstand power cuts. However, in some instances, a sudden power cut followed by a power surge can disrupt this safeguard. While the device should retain its programmed settings, there is a risk that a power surge could wipe them out, reverting the device to its default configuration. This can lead to functionality issues, potentially rendering the device temporarily inoperable until reprogrammed.

2. Hardware Damage: Power cuts, especially in regions with unstable electrical grids, are often accompanied by power surges when electricity is restored. These surges can damage the sensitive electronic components within your digital timers and Wi-Fi devices. Even minor damage can lead to malfunctions or complete failure.

3. Firmware Corruption: Power cuts can interrupt firmware updates or installations in progress. This interruption can corrupt the device’s firmware, leading to instability or rendering it inoperable. A simple reboot may not resolve the issue, as damaged firmware cannot be repaired without professional intervention.

Mitigating the Risks:

1. Surge Protectors: Installing surge protectors or uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) can safeguard your digital timers and Wi-Fi devices against power surges caused by interruptions. Surge protectors divert excess voltage away from the devices, while UPS units provide temporary battery power during outages, allowing a safe shutdown or continued operation.

2. Backup Power Sources: Consider backup power sources such as generators or solar power systems. These can keep your devices operational during prolonged power cuts, preventing data loss and damage.

3. Program Data Backup: Regularly back up the programmed settings of your devices. This ensures that, in the event of a power cut-induced reset or potential data loss due to a power surge, you can quickly restore your devices to their previous schedules and configurations. If your device lacks a built-in backup feature, physically noting down the programmed times and settings is a prudent practice to facilitate reprogramming if required.

4. Professional Installation: For complex setups, consider professional installation. Experts can provide surge protection, backup power solutions, and configure your devices for maximum resilience.

Conclusion:
Digital timers and Wi-Fi devices play a crucial role in our daily lives, bringing convenience and efficiency to various aspects. While these devices are designed to retain programmed settings, it is crucial to recognize the potential vulnerabilities during power cuts and surges. By taking proactive measures such as using surge protectors, investing in backup power sources, and ensuring regular data backups, users can effectively mitigate these risks and maintain the reliability of their digital timers and Wi-Fi devices. Power cuts can impact the longevity and functionality of these essential devices, making it essential to safeguard them against unexpected interruptions.

The minimum requirements for a heating system to be Boiler Plus compliant include the following:

  1. Efficiency Requirement: The boiler installed must be a high-efficiency condensing boiler. This means it should have an efficiency rating of at least 92% ErP (Energy-related Products) or higher. The ErP directive, which was part of the Boiler Plus regulations, sets energy efficiency standards for heating products.

  2. Programmable Timer/Thermostat: A timer or thermostat must be installed to allow homeowners to program heating times and temperatures. This ensures that the heating system operates more efficiently by reducing waste when it’s not needed.

  3. Additional Measures: In addition to the timer/thermostat, one of the following additional energy-saving measures must be implemented:

    • Load Compensation: This feature adjusts the boiler’s heat output based on the outdoor temperature and the desired indoor temperature. It ensures that the boiler operates more efficiently.
    • Weather Compensation: Similar to load compensation, weather compensation adjusts the heating system’s operation based on outdoor temperature conditions.
    • Smart Controls: The use of smart heating controls, which can be controlled remotely via a smartphone or other devices, is another compliant option.

It’s important to note that building regulations and standards may change over time. For the most up-to-date information on Boiler Plus compliance and any potential changes, it’s advisable to consult the official guidance from the UK government or a qualified heating engineer.